Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hosp. (Home Now)

A general forum for the discussion of hunting with beagles, guns, clothing and other equipment and just talking dawgs! (Tall tales on hunting allowed, but remember, first liar doesn't stand a chance)

Moderators: Pike Ridge Beagles, Aaron Bartlett

Post Reply
User avatar
Joeyman
Posts: 4524
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 4:41 pm
Location: In a Cube
Contact:

Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hosp. (Home Now)

Post by Joeyman » Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:13 pm

My male beagle Pistol is very sick. I really hate to see him like this. He is in the animal hospital staying the night. I really hope he gets better soon. Last I spoke to the vet he said he still looks the same but did get up and eat some. They are keeping him warm and comfy and a close eye on him for me. I told him to keep him for as long as it takes and I don't care how much it cost me Just make him feel better soon. I already miss the big fella he in my opinion is the best dog I own and I will really be crushed if his health goes south anymore than it is.

He has e canes which come from a tick borne illness. Vet said he probably got the tick bite during the summer and just now got sick from it. He has seen several cases so far.

I thought I'd do up a thread for my hunting buddy Pistol. I've spent many many hours running and training him in the field put in alot of work to get him where he is. He is only 4 yrs old still has plenty of hunting time left in him.

Hope you guys can keep him in your thoughts till he gets better.

Hope you feel better soon ol boy - Joey

Does anyone know how the outcome of this will be. Will the meds they are giving him help him recover. Its a tick borne illness and I think he said it was arlickia. I didn't spell that right. but some of you may know what it is. I believe they gave him a shot of Doxycycline
Last edited by Joeyman on Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
Missouri rabbits running for their lives!!!!

Give us a like on FACEBOOK search for Track Em Down Kennels

Image

User avatar
TC
Posts: 3829
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2003 1:36 am
Location: Kentucky
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by TC » Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:25 pm

Sorry to hear that Joey.
have seen it a few times but usually in the first stages and treatment was successful.
Always keep a Close Eye on your hounds fellas ANYTHING out of the ordinary or OFF a little needs to have a second look...

This type of Erhlichia is spread by the brown dog tick. This type is usually diagnosed in tropical and suptropical areas. In the United States of America it is primarily seen in the southeastern and southwestern parts of the country. These areas have large tick populations.

When the tick bites the infection is transmitted through the ticks saliva. The infection spreads (multiplies) within the white blood cells. The infection will eventually spread to and infect other organs and suppress bone morrow resulting in anemia. Unless the dogs immune system is able to fend off the infection the animal can become chronically ill.


1. The first phase, called the Acute phase lasts 2 – 4 weeks. During this phase the infection is multiplying and spreading to different organs. Symptoms during this phase include but are not limited too: anemia, depression, fever, anorexia (not eating), weight loss, discharge from the eyes and nose, edema or swelling in the legs and scrotum, and swelling of the lymph nodes.
2. The second phase is called the subclinical phase and it will appear 6 – 9 weeks after infection. There are few signs of the infection during this phase. The disease can stay in this phase for months or years before progressing to the third phase.
3. The third phase is known as the chronic phase. During this phase the bone morrow is suppressed, the result is anemia and a low platelet count and a low white blood cell count. Symptoms during this phase include but are not limited too: severe weight loss, severe weakness, bleeding from the eyes, severe infection in the eyes (uveitis), secondary bacterial infections, and neurological symptoms.

Diagnosis – Your veterinarian can diagnose Ehrlichia by running blood tests, a CBC (complete blood count) will show anemia, low platelet count, and low white blood cell count. The infection can sometimes be seen by examining a blood smear with a microscope. Your veterinarian may also recommend other tests that will look for antibodies.

Treatment – Treatment includes long term antibiotics, usually Doxycycline or Tetracycline. Very sick dogs may need blood transfusions and IV fluids for supportive care.

Additional Information – The chances of survival is usually pretty high, although I have seen some dogs die from the infection. The patient can be reinfected so the use of tick preventatives like Frontline Plus or Preventic collars are necessary
From Field to Show and Show to Field the way it should be

User avatar
JUDE
Posts: 4189
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 1:42 pm
Location: Eastern , KY

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by JUDE » Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:27 pm

I wish Pistol a speedy recovery Joey . I've watched TC on these forums
for some time now and he really knows his stuff .

.
Jude's Beagles

Always in search of a more perfect hound!

Strivingfortheperfectrabbitdawg

maplehill
Posts: 198
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2008 7:25 pm

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by maplehill » Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:48 pm

My mikey had it 2 or 3 years ago. He just started bleeding out his tail really bad because of it and would wear down really fast and have white gums. They put him on anitbiotics and told me to not run him for 3 or 4 weeks. After that, he was back to normal. Never had any problems since.
Todd Yates
Maple Hill Beagles
Poplar Bluff, MO

RIP LP RCH TY'S MAPLE HILL MIKEY
LP GRRCH TY'S MAPLE HILL MOJO "no longer own, but still claim the rabbit crazy sucker"

bigjohn
Posts: 244
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 2:23 pm
Location: Marshall,Mo.

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by bigjohn » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:00 pm

Man I really hate to hear that Joey.I know you think alot of your dogs and particlly ol' Pistol.Here's to hoping he gets well soon.

User avatar
MasonsBeagles
Posts: 2149
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2003 2:39 pm
Location: Louisville Kentucky
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by MasonsBeagles » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:02 pm

having one of your favorites sick is tough.. ive had two of mine go down in the past and it was out of nowhere and tough. hang in there and enjoy them hounds everyday as you never know what will happen...

Good luck with him Joey, I hope he pulls through.
Please visit
http://www.LiveStockSeller.com NEW LIVESTOCK SITE. Totally Free Listings
http://www.NeededPrayers.com we have just relaunched.

Triple_S

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Triple_S » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:42 pm

sorry to hear about your hound.
hope he gets better soon.

lifehog
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Oct 14, 2007 9:03 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by lifehog » Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:48 pm

Sorry to here about your hound i hope he recovers quickly.

User avatar
Terry Long
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:37 pm
Location: Geary County, Kansas Area
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Terry Long » Tue Nov 17, 2009 10:09 pm

Joeyman I wish him a speedy recover I went though the same thing this summer with my man they give him alot of meds and after about a month he was back at those bunnies Keep us posted on pistol

TC is right on the money but they give my hound steroids also and told me to keep him in the house until all the meds where gone. Ticks can really do a number on a hound good luck
GREAT PLAINS BEAGLES
http://www.greatplainsbeagles.com
AKC & UKC Registered Gundogs

tenntreedog

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by tenntreedog » Tue Nov 17, 2009 11:37 pm

Joeyman sure hope pistol gets better soon.I know when one of mine is sick it drives me crazy or maybe thats crazier.my wife fusses cause I have to be dieing before I`ll go to doctor but let one of the dogs show something wrong and off to the vet we go. just got done doctoring a pupto 2month old pup to the tune of about$300.most would not spend that on a pup but if I`m going to keep em I`m going to take care of them.

User avatar
Joeyman
Posts: 4524
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 4:41 pm
Location: In a Cube
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Joeyman » Wed Nov 18, 2009 9:29 am

thanks a bunch for your kind thoughts guys it means alot. I've been worried sick all night long. I'm getting ready to call the vet here pretty soon for an update. I hope for good news.

And TC you are dead on. His white blood cell counts were low too. But everything else checked out good in the blood results. I think we caught it early in the stages. I'm very glad to hear that dogs have recovered successfully from this. Me and ol Pistol still have many many more rabbits to run. I need the big fella with me so I'm hoping he pulls thru.
Missouri rabbits running for their lives!!!!

Give us a like on FACEBOOK search for Track Em Down Kennels

Image

User avatar
Joeyman
Posts: 4524
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 4:41 pm
Location: In a Cube
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Joeyman » Wed Nov 18, 2009 9:32 am

just got vet call its not good said he looks worse. said if it were Erhlichia he should of been much better now. Said he change meds on him. Also said his temp dropped. I couldn't speak to the doctor he was in surgery. I spoke to the lady up front. He's going to call me in a bit.
Missouri rabbits running for their lives!!!!

Give us a like on FACEBOOK search for Track Em Down Kennels

Image

Bunnyblaster
Posts: 1768
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 10:18 am
Location: Belding, MI

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Bunnyblaster » Wed Nov 18, 2009 9:57 am

I'll keep my fingers crossed for you and Pistol.
Bunnyblaster

"You can't change the past but you can ruin the present by worrying about the future."

User avatar
Joeyman
Posts: 4524
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 4:41 pm
Location: In a Cube
Contact:

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by Joeyman » Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:38 am

here is what I saw him doing


He was breathing very heavily. His nose was leaking bad. his eyes had green stuff in them. He kept his head up high and seemed to be confused and just staring off into space. Also his body and his muscles are twitching constantly like he is shaking. The doc didn't like that much either. Also his temp was normal when they checked it. Now it has dropped. He isn't eating much but did eat some. Also not drinking much either. He just sits there with his muscles twitching. He is current on all his shots and deworming tested negitive for hearworms also he has a heart mermur. Last I heard this morning his temp dropped.

anyone know what it can be? I'm waiting for the vet to call me back.
Missouri rabbits running for their lives!!!!

Give us a like on FACEBOOK search for Track Em Down Kennels

Image

madcatter
Posts: 453
Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 7:22 am

Re: Guys I need some help. My dog is at the vet Hospital

Post by madcatter » Wed Nov 18, 2009 11:42 am

found this on ehrlicha

In the past, a number of obligate intracellular organisms that infect eukaryotic cells were classified in the genus Ehrlichia on morphologic and ecologic grounds and were grouped according to the cell type they inhabit. With newer genetic analyses, these agents have been reclassified into the genera of Ehrlichia , Anaplasma , and Neorickettsia . Although no longer technically correct, usage of the term ehrlichiosis persists when describing infection caused by these agents.
Etiology:
Classical canine monocytic ehrlichiosis is caused by Ehrlichia canis , which infects the mononuclear cells of dogs; canine monocytic ehrlichiosis may also be caused by E chaffeensis , the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis. A monocytic ehrlichiosis has been identified in cats in Africa, France, and the USA; however, the exact species has not been determined. E ewingi is a granulocytic species that has been isolated from dogs and humans in the southern, western, and midwestern USA. Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum is seen in the northern midwestern, northeastern, and western coastal regions of the USA and in Europe and Asia. The host range of infection and illness for various strains within this genogroup also includes horses and ruminants; dogs and cats may occasionally be infected. Anaplasma (Ehrlichia) platys is the cause of infectious cyclic thrombocytopenia of dogs. The following discussion of ehrlichiosis primarily describes infection in dogs caused by E canis .
Back to top
Epidemiology:
E canis and A platys are enzootic in many parts of the USA and worldwide. These agents are transmitted by the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus . Rhipicephalus ticks become infected with E canis after feeding on infected dogs, and ticks transmit infection to other dogs during blood meals taken in successive life stages. Blood transfusions, or other means by which infected WBC can be transferred, may also transmit the pathogens. Other Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species have sylvan cycles in the environment involving various other tick species and wildlife reservoir hosts. In the USA, E chaffeensis and E ewingii are transmitted by Amblyomma americanum , the lone star tick. Anaplasma phagocytophilum is transmitted by Ixodes species of ticks; in the northeastern USA, infection is transmitted by I scapularis , the black-legged tick, whereas infection in western states is primarily associated with I pacificus , the Western black-legged tick. People, dogs, cats, and other domestic animals are incidental hosts of these pathogens.
Back to top
Clinical Findings:
In E canis infections, signs arise from the involvement of the hemic and lymphoreticular systems and commonly progress from acute to chronic, depending on the strain of organism and immune status of the host. In acute cases, there is reticuloendothelial hyperplasia, fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and thrombocytopenia. Variable signs of anorexia, depression, loss of stamina, stiffness and reluctance to walk, edema of the limbs or scrotum, and coughing or dyspnea may occur. Most acute cases are seen in the warmer months, coincident with the greatest activity of the tick vector.
During the acute phase of E canis infection in dogs, the hemogram is usually normal but may reflect a mild normocytic, normochromic anemia; leukopenia; or mild leukocytosis. Thrombocytopenia is common, but petechiae may not be evident, and platelet decreases may be mild in some animals. Vasculitis and immune-mediated mechanisms induce a thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic tendencies. Lymph node aspiration reveals hyperplasia. Death is rare during this phase; spontaneous recovery may occur, the dog may remain asymptomatic, or chronic disease may ensue.
Chronic ehrlichiosis caused by E canis may develop in any breed, but certain breeds, eg, German Shepherds, may be predisposed. Seasonality is not a specific hallmark of chronic infection, as appearance of chronic signs may be variably delayed following acute infection. In chronic cases, the bone marrow becomes hypoplastic, and lymphocytes and plasmacytes infiltrate various organs. Clinical findings vary based on the predominant organs affected, and may include marked splenomegaly, glomerulonephritis, renal failure, interstitial pneumonitis, anterior uveitis, and meningitis with associated cerebellar ataxia, depression, paresis, and hyperesthesia. Severe weight loss is a prominent finding.
The hemogram is usually markedly abnormal in chronic cases. Frequently, severe thrombocytopenia may cause epistaxis, hematuria, melena, and petechiae and ecchymoses of the skin. Variably severe pancytopenia (mature leukopenia, nonregenerative anemia, thrombocytopenia, or any combination thereof) may occur. Aspiration cytology reveals reactive lymph nodes and, usually, marked plasmacytosis. Frequently, polyclonal, or occasionally monoclonal, hypergammaglobulinemia occurs.
Dogs infected with A platys generally show minimal to no signs of infection despite the presence of the organism in platelets. The primary finding is cyclic thrombocytopenia, recurring at 10-day intervals. Generally, the cyclic nature diminishes, and the thrombocytopenia becomes mild and slowly resolves. Other ehrlichial infections not caused by E canis appear clinically similar to acute E canis infection, but the clinical course is usually more self-limiting. Shifting leg lameness and fever of unknown origin may be present. Thrombocytopenia and mild leukopenia or leukocytosis may occur during the acute course of infection, which is clinically more discrete. Chronic disease, as seen with E canis infection, is not typically seen in other ehrlichial infections.
Lesions:
During the acute or self-limiting phase of E canis infections, lesions generally are nonspecific, but splenomegaly is common. Histologically, there is lymphoreticular hyperplasia, and lymphocytic and plasmacytic perivascular cuffing. In chronic cases, these lesions may be accompanied by widespread hemorrhage and increased mononuclear cell infiltration in perivascular regions of many organs.
Back to top
Diagnosis:
Because thrombocytopenia is a relatively consistent finding of infection with Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species, a platelet count is an important screening test. Clinical diagnosis may be confirmed by demonstrating the organisms within WBC, seen in intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies called morulae. This method of diagnosis lacks sensitivity, as low numbers of organisms make demonstration difficult. More commonly, a diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical signs, positive indirect serum fluorescent antibody titer, and response to treatment. The antibody response may be delayed up to 28 days; thus, serologic testing may not be a reliable diagnostic tool early in the course of the disease, and testing of paired sera and demonstration of increased antibody titers is recommended to confirm infection. Serologic cross-reactivity is strong between E canis , E chaffeensis , and E ewingi ; minimal cross-reactivity to Anaplasma phagocytophilum is also seen. These reactions should be considered in appropriate geographic areas. In some areas, ~50% of dogs infected with E canis also have a titer to A platys , which likely reflects co-infection; cross-reactivity between these agents is not observed.
PCR has been used to detect and identify specific Ehrlichia species in infected people and animals. Samples appropriate for PCR include blood, tissue aspirates, or biopsy specimens of reticuloendothelial organs such as lymph nodes, spleen, liver, or bone marrow. PCR can also be used to detect the effectiveness of treatment in clearing infection. PCR is not routinely available through commercial laboratories, although some veterinary schools and research institutions may offer it.
During the acute stage, differential diagnoses include other causes of fever and lymphadenomegaly (eg, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, brucellosis, blastomycosis, endocarditis), immune-mediated diseases (eg, systemic lupus erythematosus), and lymphosarcoma. During the chronic stage of E canis infection, differential diagnoses include estrogen toxicity, myelophthisis, immune-mediated pancytopenia, and other multisystemic diseases associated with specific organ dysfunction (eg, glomerulonephritis).
Back to top
Treatment:
The drug of choice for all forms of infection caused by these organisms is doxycycline because of its superior intracellular penetration. The recommended dosage is 5-10 mg/kg, PO or IV, sid for 10-21 days. Tetracycline (22 mg/kg, PO, tid) can also be used for ≥2 wk in acute cases and 1-2 mo in chronic cases. Two doses of imidocarb dipropionate (5-7 mg/kg, IM), 2 wk apart, are variably effective against both ehrlichiosis and some strains of babesiosis. In acute cases receiving appropriate antibiotic therapy, body temperature is expected to return to normal within 24-48 hr after treatment. In chronic cases, the hematologic abnormalities may persist for 3-6 mo, although clinical response to treatment often occurs much sooner. Supportive therapy may be necessary to combat wasting and specific organ dysfunction; platelet or whole-blood transfusions may be required if hemorrhage is extensive. Concurrent broad-spectrum antibiotics may be needed if the dog has severe leukopenia. The E canis antibody titer should be measured again within 6 mo of illness to confirm a low or seronegative status indicative of successful therapy. Serum titers that persist at lower but positive levels should be rechecked in another 6 mo to ensure that they are not increasing.
Back to top
Prevention:
Prevention is enhanced by controlling ticks and using seronegative screened blood donors. Prophylactic administration of tetracycline at a lower dose (6.6 mg/kg, PO, sid) is effective in preventing E canis infection in kennels where disease is endemic. Treatment must be extended for many months through at least one tick season if the endemic cycle is to be successfully eliminated.
Back to top

Post Reply